Ep 058: You Can Stay Home With Your Kids with Erin Odom

Facebook_EP_058.png

Do you desire to stay at home with your kids? I think we all do, at some point. But often, we are held back by this fear of finances. I want to encourage you that just because you stay home with your kids doesn’t mean you have to lack financially. There are plenty of ways you can stay at home with your kids while making an income. You can do it! Ask yourself, what am I good at? You are good at something. It may not be writing or podcasting, but it may be art or sewing or taking care of animals. Whatever you are good at, you can learn how to create more income with that!

Erin Odom is a stay at home, working mom to 4 who is passionate about helping other moms stay home with their kids and there is a lot that goes into that. From budgeting tips, bringing in some extra side income, turning a blog into a money maker, and more. She has so much to share with us in this episode!

 
 

In This Episode, Allie + Erin Discuss:

  • The importance of focusing on happiness, not finances when transitioning to working from home with your kids.

  • The top 3 things that you can do to take control of you life and finances so you can stay home with your kids.

  • What getting intentional with your finances looks like and how you can be purposeful in this area of your life.

  • Practical ways that you can start making money from home and some tips to help you get started.

Mentioned in this Episode:

Starter_Kit_Mock.png

Have you been feeling really overwhelmed, not knowing where to start? Maybe you've been listening to the show for a while and you always hear me talk about simplifying your home. Letting things go that you don't really need. Simplifying your lifestyle. And you haven't really done much or you tried to start, but life got in the way and it just didn't go well. Whatever the reason may be that you're feeling a little cluttered, a little overwhelmed, that there's just always too much. 

I have put together a FREE guide to build some serious momentum for you to help launch you forward into success in your minimalist journey. And remember, minimalism does not have to be this stereotype thing where you basically own nothing. You count how many jeans you have. You don't get to shop. It's not this joy-sucking horror show. It's life giving. It's joyful. It's about having what you love and what you really need. Creating space for you to live a full, abundant, intentional life focused on your family. That's what really matters, right?


who doesn't love a GIVEAWAY?

Reviews are everything on iTunes! Would you take a minute and click here to leave a review? Email hello@alliecasazza.com with a screenshot of your review on iTunes. You'll be entered to win one of Allie's amazing courses for FREE!  

If you have a question, comment or a suggestion about today’s episode, or the podcast in general, send me an email at hello@alliecasazza.com or connect with me over on Facebook & Instagram


Don't have time to listen_.png

Mom life. We are surrounded with the message that it’s the tired life. The no-time-for-myself life. The hard life. And while it is hard and full of lots of servitude, the idea that motherhood means a joyless life is something I am passionate about putting a stop to. I’m on a mission to help you stop counting down the minutes till bedtime, at least most days. I want you to stop cleaning up after your kid’s childhood and start being present for it. Start enjoying it. I believe in John 10:10 “that we are called to abundant life” and I know mothers are not excluded from that promise. Join me in conversations about simplicity, minimalism and lots of other good stuff that leads to a life of less for the sake of enjoying more in your motherhood. I’m Allie Casazza and this is The Purpose Show.

_______________________________________________________________

ALLIE: Hi, sweet friends! Welcome to this episode!

I am really looking forward to introducing you to Erin Odom. You might already know her as The Humbled Homemaker, and if you don't then I feel really honored to be the one who introduced you to her. Erin is really special. She's actually one of the only bloggers that I've followed for a really long time, maybe even before I started my blog (or at least around the same time.)

I've always admired her and followed her stuff. She has a lot to say about lots of different things that have to do with being a homemaker and raising kids. Similar to how I used to blog about a lot of things and I still kind of do, but I really have honed in on minimalism and simplifying your space so that you can have more time and all that. Erin has really zeroed in on helping other moms stay home with their kids and there is a lot that goes into that. Budgeting tips. Bringing in some extra side income. Turning a blog into a money maker. Different things like that. That's really where her passion lies and that's what we're talking about today. So, without further ado, let's welcome Erin.

ALLIE: Hey ladies! Welcome back to another episode of The Purpose Show! I am very, very honored and excited to introduce today's guest to you. I have Erin Odom here with me. She is The Humbled Homemaker online. Thank you so much for taking time out of your schedule to be with us, Erin.

ERIN: Thank you so much for having me, Allie. I'm happy to be here.

ALLIE: I'm so excited to have you. I was just saying to Erin guys before we hit record, that she is one of the earlier bloggers that I followed. I looked up to you and always followed along on your journey and what you were sharing in your blog for years now. So, I'm really excited to have you here. This is great.

Okay, so Erin is the author of three books?

ERIN: I have two books with a publisher and then I have several ebooks too.

ALLIE: Okay.

ERIN:  My two that came out this year with a publisher are with Zondervan: More Than Just Making It and then the one I think you're going to talk about a little bit today, You Can Stay Home With Your Kids.

ALLIE: Yes. Okay, so I have the book here and it is just the cutest little square book. It has the cutest cover. It is called You Can Stay Home With Your Kids and it is 100 tips, tricks and ways to make it work on a budget.

And like I was saying to you, Erin, before we recorded, in episode six of this show (those of you who have listened) I shared me and Brian’s story of just barely making it. Really struggling. Food bank. Really just America's version of poverty I guess. Evictions. Repossessions. I mean really bad. And the overwhelming response was, “How can I get to the other side like you guys did? I would love to know more about what I can do.”

And it goes beyond just having a blog going viral. It's not luck. It was a lot about cutting back first and getting down to the nitty gritty of how are we overspending. Even though it feels like we're barely getting by, there's always more wiggle room you can create. There's always hope and there's always action you can take to improve this area of your life.

I feel like that's the tone of your book. It's very happy and hopeful and it's not “well just do more. Just cut back. Sorry, you don't get to have a phone.” It's very hope-filled, but also practical and I really like that.

ERIN: Thanks so much. I really want to give people hope. We were exactly where you were Allie, and I love when I meet other people that have that story because, one, I felt alone. I don't know about you, but I felt alone because people don't normally talk about it when they're struggling, and so I didn't tell that many people. That means that I struggled in kind of in isolation. So, our family stories are very similar. God really used my blog is the catalyst to bring us out of a low income, but He also used many other things and I share those in my new book, You Can Stay Home With Your Kids.

My first book, I shared it with more of a memoir, but I truly believe whether you think that you can blog or something else, that we all have that hope of getting to the place where we can stay at home with our kids and not feel so much of a financial frustration in the process.

ALLIE: Yeah, absolutely. And I wanted you to tell about yourself, but I'm getting sidetracked. But first I wanted to say recently I was scrolling through something, I don't know where I saw it, but I saw something that had this tone that I see out there all the time. It was something about “let's not focus on money; let's focus on being happy” or something like that. Maybe you would agree, but coming through what I've been through, stuff like that kind of bothers me a little bit. You can say that, but I feel if you would say that, you haven't been without money, without anything.

You haven't been struggling to where you wake up and the first thought is, “what am I going to say to the landlord today? How am I going to make this bowl of cereal stretch to three? How am I going to make this work?” The lack of financial freedom in my family was such a heavy weight. It was just breathtaking and incredibly oppressive.

And I believe that is not abundant life. That is not what we're called to. And yes, money should not be our obsessive focus, and “let’s all gain, gain, and greed.” However, money makes the world go round and without money you can't give freely. You can't take a deep breath and enjoy going out to dinner with your family without freaking out about how are you going to pay the bills now.

And so, I feel like I get that tone from your book, that this isn't really about getting more money or about being so scrappy that that's your main focus. It's just about creating more space and I guess, breathability, in your life and your family so you can focus on what matters really.

ERIN: Absolutely. And I will tell you Allie, it's a really fine balance. When we were going through that low-income period…well first of all for years, I thought this is going to be life forever. There is no light at the end of the tunnel. And there are times even today where I'm given opportunities and I say “no” a lot, because I have four kids. You know, I run my blog as our business, and I write, but then there'll be something that comes on my path and it's a lot of money and I say “no” to it.

It's like I have this little pause of “what if I say no, and one day we run out of money” because of what I was going through, you know we didn't have many. We got to the end of the month and we didn't have anything in our refrigerator or cabinet. And I was like thank the Lord for these WIC checks because that was all that we had to eat, you know?

But I do think it's a fine line because I got to a point where we were starting to see the light at the end of the tunnel and we were starting to have more income and I prayed, “God, help me not to forget this feeling. Help me not to forget what it was like not to have a whole lot so I can continue to cultivate gratitude” and it has made a huge difference. I will say that God has really honored that prayer in my life.

You and I both know the sky's kind of the limit in blogging and online entrepreneurship and I'm sometimes bothered by the focus on “let's just get more and more and more and more.” I don't know if this will be a book one day or not, but my focus now is, okay, what is enough?” Because we have enough. And how could we cultivate gratitude?

And today I look at money as” money is not evil.” The love of money is the root of evil. And so yes, like what you said, we have to have money to live. I remember feeling a little self-conscious. It was me; people probably weren't judging me, but I didn't tell a lot of people why I was trying to really grow the blog.

And I was hustling, hustling, hustling in the beginning. I really burnt myself out. I would stay up till 3 o’clock in the morning, all night long. I was working during the days, a lot. I felt sometimes like my friends in real life we're judging me, but they didn't know that we didn't have enough money to live. And even some of my blogging friends in the beginning, we're just, “Erin, you know, you're growing but you're burning yourself out.” And I was like, “Guys, we've got to have money to live.”

And so, there is that difference and it's just that balance of discovering “What is enough?” Because I think we can get to a point where we love money so much that we do end up neglecting what is the most important. We ask whenever we want to create more income to give our families some wiggle room, what is the goal? And for me it was to be able to stay home with my kids. So, I have that “check” in my spirit whenever I realize I'm getting burned out and I'm neglecting my kids because of my work.

ALLIE: Yeah, absolutely. I totally know what you mean. it's like a constant “check,” a constant balance. Also, I think we love what we do. It's fun. I feel like sometimes I don't realize I'm getting burned out until it's almost not too late, but I'm deep in it, deep in the burnout phase. And so, to take some time off or whatever. But yeah, I understand everything, every bit of what you're saying.

So, you said you have four kids, so what ages do you have?

ERIN: My oldest will be 10 this summer, so I started this mom journey almost 10 years ago. My second is 7 ½. My third is 5 and they're all little girls. And then I have a 13-month-old little boy.

ALLIE: Oh my gosh. Yeah. My oldest is 9 and it feels weird. There's something that feels a little more legit or something about having a kid that’s a little bit older and having more “kid” issues than toddler. It's weird. That's exciting.

When you started your blog, did you immediately start sharing tips and tricks for budgeting and staying home or did you transition into that as a blogger?

ERIN: I transitioned into that as a blogger. At first, I was just kind of blogging about anything, a lot about motherhood, a lot about encouraging moms, a lot about what I was doing in my own life. In the early years it was breastfeeding and toddlerhood and all that. And then in the fall of 2012, I had been blogging for a year and a half at that point.

I did a joint series with some other bloggers on motherhood and we said, “Okay, let's assign each of us a different facet of motherhood that we can talk about.” And they knew that I was struggling financially, but my readers didn't know and they said, “Okay, Erin, we think you should be the person to write a post called “staying at home with your kids when you can barely afford it.” And that was the first post I really wrote about anything financial. It was really the most vulnerable post, the first time I've been very vulnerable in the blog.

I had been real. I had been authentic, but I hadn't been that vulnerable. I was really scared. I basically said “we're living on a rice and beans budget.” I clicked “publish” and I was like, “okay, maybe nobody will read this and I won't have to be embarrassed.” And I woke up to tens of thousands of page views and hundreds of comments.

It's been over five years and I still get page views to that blog post every day. I still get emails like “I read this post…” And I realized then I'm not alone in this. There are other moms just like me who are barely making ends meet. They're afraid to tell anyone. And they don't know how to do it. They don't know how to stay at home with their kids and also have that breathing room. They're constantly burdened with the weight of not having enough money.

ALLIE: Yeah. It weighs so heavy that it starts to affect everything. That's the thing I was saying earlier that bothers me about quotes like that, like “let's just be happy and not focus on money.” It bothers me because I feel like it was so heavy that it made me a bad mom. I was snappy and stressed. I always use the example that I felt like I was like Saran wrap stretched over a casserole, one little poke and it just comes apart. Like one thing goes wrong, $1 less and it matters.

And that affected my marriage and my motherhood. It affected my health a lot. My stress levels were through the roof. I didn't feel like getting up and going and doing anything with friends when I was invited. I couldn't, but I didn't feel like it anyway. I was depressive. It matters.

And so, I love the freedom of that you say, and that I will always say is, it's okay to want more and to do something out of the ordinary to get there, to give yourself that wiggle room that you need.

Having said all of that, what would you say? What are your top tips or top three things that people can do if they're listening to this? Maybe there's somebody who's working outside of the home, hates it and just desperately wants to be home, but she knows they need that income. What would you say to her to maybe start taking some action steps to changing her situation?

ERIN: I would say you have to figure out what is the root reason why you can't be a stay-at-home mom, if you want to be a stay-at-home mom. Some people are called to whatever career and I want to make it very clear that there should be no shaming of any mom, whether she's a working mom or a work-at-home mom, (which I think the two of us really are work-at-home moms - we stay home with our kids, but we work at home) or a full-time stay-at-home mom. There's no shame.

But if you do desire to be at home with your kids, what is keeping you back? What's the root cause? Is it because you have an income problem? You don't have enough money to live just on your husband's salary? That was our family's issue. My husband is very fine with me saying that. I talk about it in both of my books a lot. Honestly, we look back and we feel like we were so naive. We didn't know that we didn't have enough money to live.

We were spinning our wheels thinking we are doing something wrong. What we were doing wrong was that we didn't know we didn't have enough, and we had a financial advisor from our church who helped us discover that. So, do you have an income problem, mom? Do you simply not have enough money to live with just one parent working outside of the home? Or is there a spending problem?

I call these problems, but there’s grace, whichever one you have. I'm not trying to come down on you. I'm saying are there areas of spending that you could cut back in order to have the margin you need to be able to give up your salary as a full-time, outside-of-the-home, working mom?

Or are there gifts, and I believe all of us have gifts, that you have that you can use to create income from home and that can be your income problem solution. Creating an income from home.

So, I would say figure out the root cause. What is the root reason why you can't stay at home? Do you have an income problem? Do you have a spending problem? And from there seek ways to curb spending or create more income.

If the spending is your problem, I encourage you to take this next month and record every single penny you've spent - every penny - and at the end of the month, take that list and divide it into two. What are these things that are absolute necessities for us to live? Utilities, rent or your mortgage, food. I would argue that there's ways to trim your food budget too.

What are things that are wants? What are areas we spend on? Our wants are not bad in and of themselves, especially if you have the money to do them, but those are going to be things like going to the movies, going out to eat, cable, the gym membership.

Again, I am all for adding those things back into your budget whenever you learn to create more income, but those are things that you can take away in the temporary so you could come home with your kids.

So, if you have the income problem, I encourage you (I love talking about this) to list some different gifts and talents you have. Are you good at art?

There was one lady I include in my book who loved painting her kids' faces. She created a business called “The Joy of Face Painting (her name is Joy) where she goes to children's birthday parties and she's paid to paint faces. I think that's so creative.

Allie and I, we blog. She podcasts and does YouTube. I'm hoping to do some more of that stuff in the future, but that's how we were created and there may be some of your listeners who are the same way. They're talented in the media arts.

But just because you're not doesn't mean that you can't create more income from home in the way that you are talented. Do you love animals? Maybe you could be a dog groomer in your own house. I love to tell people, “think back to when you were a child, what made you come alive? You know, I was always writing stories, but what about you? What is it for you? I think you can use that and you can create income from home with wherever that is.

ALLIE: Yeah, absolutely. You can do “that thing” for pay or you could create a business teaching other people how to be good at that thing too. There's so much. I love that you said earlier too that there are no limits. There really are no limits. It's such a good time.

I was overwhelmed by the messages after that one episode I told you about and I kept responding to everybody. They were spiraling and kind of stressing out like, “I want to do this to you, but I don't know how.” It's such a hopeful time. There are no limits. You can literally make a business online out of almost anything. It's amazing. For such a little cost too. I mean I did everything. We found a work around to do everything before I could afford anything. It was just an amazing time to be a creative woman who wants to be home with their kids and wants to do something.

I think too, the other benefit is you get to have a little side thing too that’s your passion Not just about the money, you get to have a little side hustle and something that you're passionate about outside of raising your kids, which is great.

_______________________________________________________________

Hey girl! Real quick, let me tell you about something that I've created that is totally free and amazing that I'm so excited to have you get your hands on. It is called my Minimalism Starter Kit.

Have you been feeling really overwhelmed, not knowing where to start? Maybe you've been listening to the show for a while and you always hear me talk about simplifying your home. Letting things go that you don't really need. Simplifying your lifestyle. And you haven't really done much or you tried to start, but life got in the way and it just didn't go well.

Whatever the reason may be that you're feeling a little cluttered, a little overwhelmed, that there's just always too much. Maybe you're constantly cleaning and you feel like the house is actually never clean. I can totally help you and it can be simple to get started.

I have put together The Starter Kit to basically build some serious momentum for you to help launch you forward into success in your minimalist journey. And remember, minimalism does not have to be this stereotype thing where you basically own nothing. You count how many jeans you have. You don't get to shop. It's not this joy-sucking horror show.

It's life giving. It's joyful. It's about having what you love and what you really need. Creating space for you to live a full, abundant, intentional life focused on your family. That's what really matters, right?

The Minimalism Starter Kit will basically walk you through what minimalism actually is. A healthy, happy, realistic version of it. For moms, written by me, for you. It goes through why would you want to do this? What's it going to do for you? Where's it going to take you?

It helps you find your why and has you answer some questions for yourself. It's fillable on the computer or you could print it out and fill it in like a journal with a pen old school style.

It will walk you through decluttering your laundry and dishes - the two biggest time suckers for Moms, right?

It will also give you a list of 15-minute, quick and easy decluttering projects for the busy mom who doesn't know where to start.

It also includes a list of 20 things that you can get rid of right now.

This is a serious momentum builder. It's about getting started in making decisions and letting go of stuff right now. It empowers you and it will help you keep going. It also includes a 10-minute declutter challenge.

It'll help you keep going after you're done with The Minimalism Starter Kit.

It has resources and some really punchy words in there from me to you that will help you keep going. It's got resources like my top blog posts and top other things I have put together that are totally free for you to keep going.

Go check it out. alliecasazza.com/starterkit.

_______________________________________________________________

ALLIE: Okay. So, in a summary or one sentence, what does getting intentional with our finances look like in your opinion? And how can we get purposeful in this area of our lives? I feel like you’ve somewhat answered this, but maybe just for somebody who might be afraid to look.

I feel like a lot of people avoid money altogether. That's how I was. That's how I responded to really “the trauma” of what had happened with us. Just avoid it. I don't even want to see it. I didn't want to say the word “budget.” It was hard for me for a long time.

If somebody is really struggling and doesn't even know what to do, how does it look to really be a good steward, I guess? And get intentional with this area of our lives? This show is all about getting purposeful with each topic that we talk about.

ERIN: I can be like you, Allie, and I can just say, “Okay, I just don't even want to know” because my husband does manage our finances. It's scary when you have lived in that season (for us it was years, and it sounds like for you too) where you don't have a whole lot. You don’t want to look at what you have.

I have learned when you discover your root issue of your financial frustration and then you seek to better that, if you live by a budget, it'll give you more security. If you begin to budget and you begin to take out things that are wants in order to curb spending and create more income, when you have a budget, you're going to be able to look and say, “Okay, I do have some money that I can spend.”

So, I would encourage you to go back to that list of wants and needs. Record everything for a month. Divide them up – wants and needs. Look at what you can take away and then from there create a budget.

So, anyone who gets my book I have in the book itself (these are not even included in the preorder bonuses which people can get right now) a link to extra resources and one of them is a printable budgeting sheet. There's lots of printable budgets sheets. If you google “free printable budget sheet” you'll find one I'm sure. But with that, what our family does is we categorize everything. For example, we have a clothing budget.

Before when we didn't have a budget and we barely had any money, if I needed a new pair of jeans, I was just struck and overcome with overwhelm, fear, and had this huge burden of “I need a new pair of jeans and I don't know that we have the money for me to buy them.”

But now how we have our budget, we have a clothing fund and so now I am sure if we have the money in there to buy a pair of jeans.

Does that make sense?

ALLIE: Yeah, instead of just avoiding it - whether you have a lot or a little - instead of avoiding it, it's taking control and realizing “whatever money is there, it doesn't really help me if I don't know about it.” So, taking ownership of what you have and coming to terms with your role with it.

ERIN: Absolutely. And that was the thing sometimes, especially after the blog started making money, there would be money there and I still didn't want to spend anything because I was scared.

ALLIE: Yeah. In the beginning, for me, it felt very much like this is a limited-time thing so we should just hold onto this like crazy. My story is different. I didn't leak in; we had a big wave from virality. That was even worse because it was like, “okay, well this is going to die down and then that's it.” And it was very much not an abundance mentality of, “you know, there's always more where that came from. There's always more than I do.”

So, I was terrified. Then Good Morning America wanted to come over to our house to interview us and it was empty. I was so embarrassed. I was panicking and torn between do I get some furniture or not? If I do, then I'm going to spend the money. I was panicking.

The Lord really washed over me with “this isn't all I'm going to do. There is more where that came from.” And then that also is in forgiving. Giving and being a good steward. Saving and setting aside. Money is meant to be used. But when you have that control over it and you feel wise about it and you have a clue what's going on, it's so much more empowering than avoidance. Avoidance just feels like stabbing in the dark, not really being sure what you're spending

ERIN: From a spiritual standpoint, I talk about a lot in my book, More Than Just Making It, God really taught me He's the provider of all of our needs. It's really interesting because I talked about that a lot in my first book and then this past year we had a tough year. Now, was it tough compared to a few years ago? No, not at all.

I had a baby. That was a wonderful surprise but in the middle of writing and launching two books all within the past 13 months. So, God has been showing me again, “Just how I took care of you in the past. I'm going to continue to take care of you. I'm going to continue to provide for your needs.” That doesn't mean that we just sit on our butts and don't do anything. But that mentality of “I’ve got to hoard this or it's going to go away,” I understand. I totally relate to you because I think it was trauma we went through too. We lost a house in the recession and I declared bankruptcy at eight months pregnant with my third child.

ALLIE: Yeah, it definitely doesn't “do nothing” to you. It will definitely kind of mess you up a little bit to go through things like that. You think, “I've seen money come and go and I don't want it to go again.” But you know it's a fear-based decision and I don't want to live my life out of that.

If anyone is listening and feeling the same, I would just encourage you to deal with that and learn to let it go because any lifestyle lived out of fear is just not God's will for you at all. It’s not abundant life and that's what we're here for. That's what He came to give us.

Okay. So, my last question for you is what is one really commonly asked question that you get all the time? I'm sure people listening are thinking the same thing and you know better than I do what that might be. And then maybe share your response to that.

ERIN: Yeah. Well we've really talked about it a lot, but it is, “How could I do what you've done? How can I make money from home?” I know you said that you covered that in Episode 6 about your story. If you're listening and you're saying, “Oh my goodness, Erin and Allie, I'm living that life that you were living, but I'm living it now and the tunnel is so dark. Sure, you ladies have done that, but how could I do it? I'm barely making it and I want to stay home with my kids.”

I would say, “You can do it. There is hope.” Sit down today. Take a few minutes and I want you to write down what are you good at. You are good at something. It may not be writing, it may not be podcasting, but it may be art. It may be sewing. It may be taking care of animals. Something. I challenge you to sit down today and I want you to just do a bubble map and brainstorm what are some of those talents I have. Then from there you can learn how to create more income with that.

ALLIE: Yeah, absolutely. Keep it simple. Not using what we're doing or somebody else's example as your guiding point, but just what are you good at? Then working around that.

What's really important for me, too, is I'm used to being a stay-at-home mom. I was happy doing that. I didn't think, “Oh, I wish I could do something else.” I wanted to contribute, especially when we were struggling, but Brian & I both agreed that was where I was supposed to be and it was good. But now that I am working, the only thing that makes me so happy and excited to even be doing this is because I love it.

I think it's so important that you base it on something that you do enjoy doing. Not just like, “Oh, I'm good at this, so I guess I'll try to make an extra 10 bucks.”

It is time away from your kids. It just is. I mean it can help make your family's quality of life so much better. But it still should be something that you enjoy, that you feel called to. When you're walking in that purpose, nothing really matters compared to that. It doesn't matter how much money you're making. It's good, it's fun and enjoyable and it can add to your family's finances too.

ERIN: Just for effort, three practical resources, because that is the question I get all the time, “How could I do what you have done?” There are three different business resources for women in business that I have used and loved.

One of those is Christy Wright’s Business Boutique. They have a conference every year in Nashville, but she also has a free podcast, a book and a lot of different resources. It’s through the Dave Ramsey Association.

Another one is Brilliant Business Moms and they have a podcast. I think they're taking a hiatus right now with the podcast, but they have a great support group on Facebook and a ton of resources online.

The other one is iBloom In Business.

Maybe you can link to them in the show notes. But those are three that if you're listening and you desperately want to be able to do what we've done, those are helpful and they're not just blogging specific. They are for how are you created and gifted or what are you passionate about? And let's take it from there and create a business around it.

ALLIE: Love that. Okay. We'll definitely link to all those things. And to your book, when does this come out? It's not out yet, right?

No, it's out April 10th. So, You Can Stay Home With Your Kids is out April 10th and anyone who preorders between now and April 10th, they will get some preorder bonuses. One of my favorite businesses, Free Reign Farms is giving a coupon gift certificate for free chocolate fudge. They came out with that and I was like, “What mom doesn’t need more chocolate? Hello? And also some bath bombs. They’re also going to get a 2-week Aldi meal plan and a nice art print that my publisher will mail to them with an inspirational quote from the book.

Also my other book is already out, it's called More Than Just Making It: Hope For The Heart Of The Financially Frustrated. It's my memoir. There's practical meat in it as well. It's really raw. I mean it starts out with me going into the food stamps office.

ALLIE: I might have an emotional breakdown if I read that one.  

ERIN: I want you to read it because then you're going to say “I could totally have written this book” because I think our stories are so similar and it's so good to not feel alone.  

And ladies, if your listening, you are not alone. Seriously. You’ve got two people here.

ALLIE: Yeah. And that went to the other side. So, there is so much help for you guys and that's really why I wanted to have Erin on for you guys.

So, thank you Erin so much. Again. I'm so excited to have you here. This was so great. Thank you so much.

ERIN: Thank you so much for having me, Allie!

ALLIE: And guys, we'll link to everything in the show notes. So just head over there. Alliecasazza.com/shownotes/58. We'll link to the books and all of those resources to Erin listed. So go check it out.


_______________________________________________________________

This was an episode of The Purpose Show. Did you know there is an exclusive community created solely for the purpose of continuing discussions surrounding The Purpose Show episodes? And to get you to actually take action and make positive changes on the things that you learn here? Go be a part of it. To join go to facebook.com/groups/purposefulmamas.

Thank you so much for tuning in. If you are ready to uplevel and really take action on the things I talk about on my show, and get step-by-step help from me, head to alliecasazza.com. There are free downloads, courses, classes, and ways to learn more about what the next step might look like for you and to focus on whatever you might need help with in whatever season you are in right now.  

I am always rooting for you, friend!

See ya next time!

Hey mama! Just a quick note, this post may contain affiliate links.

 

Allie Casazza

Allie Casazza , Murrieta, CA